Eco-Art on 8th

Eco-Art on 8th
By Karen Bubb, Public Art manager

The Eco-Art Projects on 8th is a collection of public artworks  commissioned by Capital City Development Corporation, Boise City, and GreenWorks Idaho. This collection of,  permanent, site-specific artwork integrates environmental and sustainability concepts to bring greater awareness of related issues. In addition, the project is designed to activate pedestrian areas of Boise’s urban core, thus contributing to a more livable and economically vibrant community.

Heliotrope

Heliotrope, 2013
Steel and living plants
By Dwaine Carver with Trout Architects/Chartered
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Boise’s World Trade Center 9/11 Memorial Complete

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Boise’s World Trade Center 9/11 Memorial Complete
By Karen Bubb, Public Arts Manager

There are over 700 recorded 9/11 memorials in the United States, many with remnants of the World Trade Center towers, as Boise has received. Some of these mark the sad event; others are for the specific people who died that day. Boise’s Fire Department staff initiated this memorial, which is created in solidarity with police, fire, and emergency personnel lost that day and to honor those who put their lives on the line every day in service to citizens’ safety. Boise’s Percent-for-Art ordinance and Fire Department paid for the $30,000 memorial.

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Return Of The Tiny House

Boise House Built 1943 Total 732sqft

Return of the Tiny House
By Brandi Burns, History Programs Manager

Today, wherever you look you can find mention of the growing popularity of “tiny houses.” From a complete documentary (Tiny: A Story About Living Small) to several magazines featuring tiny houses (dwell—featuring a Boise tiny house in their September 2014 edition to House Beautiful’ s July/August edition about decorating small spaces) the tiny house is taking the nation by storm. If that’s not enough to whet your appetite for tiny living, look online to find communities for tiny house aficionados, such as a local Meetup group “Idaho Tiny House Enthusiasts”.

So why all the hype about tiny houses?

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Creative Opportunities Keep Tony Caprai in Boise

Toni Capri

Creative Opportunities Keep Tony Caprai in Boise
by Karen Bubb, Public Arts Manager

After graduating from Boise State University with a B.A. in Visual Arts in 2010, Tony Caprai was on the lookout for chances to practice his craft. He found opportunities on the artist-organized project “Freak Alley,” where he collaborated with other artists on a few murals in 2012 and 2013. He also found work creating murals for local businesses in town like The Lift, The Brickyard, The Knitting Factory and The Underground. He also made his own opportunities – such as through apprenticing with Tony Adamson and Sector 17 to hone his painting techniques.

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BSU Geothermal Public Art Project Proposals Open For Public Comment

Boise City’s Public Works Department and Boise State University are partnering to commission a public art project to celebrate the use of geothermal water on campus. The committee organizing the project has identified the desired site for the new artwork, on campus just past Capitol Bridge not far from the Greenbelt. A selection panel chose three finalists, who have created site-specific proposals. The public is invited to comment on these proposals, identifying which they like, and why, or which they don’t like and why. The criteria for selection is appropriateness for the site, quality of the art, and ability to be built within the budget, which is $22,000. Thank you for your engagement in the public process.

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Closed Loop_Grover

Closed Loop by Matt Grover
“Closed Loop” is an eight foot tall stainless steel sculpture on a two-foot high concrete base. With two sides that meet on top in a spiral, it depicts a naturally occurring artesian geothermal hot spring with its hot water, represented by cut out circles turning to solid spheres, rising through a fault line. It invites viewers to learn more about Boise’s geothermal past and present.

VIEW PROPOSAL>>

 

 

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Horswill Palici Site Image

Palici, by Michael Horswill
Fire, earth, water, and air is united in an organic-industrial earth machine entitled “Palici” that honors the incredible underground labyrinth of wells and pipes in Boise. It is an educational and playful representation of the geothermal system. Earth is represented with rusted steel roots. The geothermal system is seen as a mechanical system. The air released above is shown as a celebratory crown of acrylic spheres.

VIEW PROPOSAL>>

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McCall_DixonTransference, by Ken McCall and Leslie Dixon
The elegant simplicity of the circular nature of the geothermal system is represented in “Transference,” a painted steel and Plexiglas sculpture. The aboveground journey of the geothermic water unfolds along the twelve-foot wide circle. Motifs of conduits and gauges cut from steel encase transparent panes of red and amber Plexiglas that gradually flex open as they rise. The cut-steel panels illustrate map locations of buildings in downtown and on the BSU campus that receive the geothermal system.

VIEW PROPOSAL>>

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Last Chance – Alive After Five 2014 Downtown Grove Plaza

Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles

Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles

Don’t miss out on the last two Wednesday Alive After Five Summer Concert Series performances –it’s your last chance of the season to attend this free live music event featuring opening local bands and national touring performers.

Alive After Five is held downtown on the Grove Plaza from 5pm to 8pm. It’s the 28th year of the Downtown Boise Association’s program, and the fifth year the Boise City Department of Arts & History has provided support for the local opening bands, which are selected and managed by the fabulous crew from GO LISTEN BOISE.

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“Virgo,” a Public Artwork by Amy Westover & McKibben | Cooper Architects

Amy Westoversm

“Virgo,” a Public Artwork by Amy Westover & McKibben | Cooper Architects
by Karen Bubb, Public Arts Manager

If, on the night of the upcoming autumnal equinox (September 23), you stood at the intersection of 8th and Front Streets in downtown Boise and looked up, what would you see? The sky above would be black with a few points of light, hinting as distant stars.

If you want to see the constellations, look down at your feet and you’ll find a new public artwork called “Virgo” by Amy Westover and McKibben | Cooper Architects. Westover mapped out the star patterns into the brick plaza in front of Urban Outfitters, representing stars with steel discs and the constellation lines with saw-cut tracks between.

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What Will Be Your Legacy?

Boise City Miner Letter

Boise City Miner Letter

 What Will Be Your Legacy?
By Brandi Burns, History Programs Manager

“Everyone must leave something behind when he dies…” writes Ray Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451. He continues, “A child or a book or a painting or a house built or a pair of shoes made. Or a garden planted. Something your hand touched some way. So your soul has somewhere to go when you die, and when people look at that tree or that flower you planted, you’re there.”

So the question is: What will you leave behind — What will be your legacy?

Since August is National “What Will Be Your Legacy?” Month, the Department of Arts & History (A&H) encourages you to start saving your personal collections now. Preserve them for your family and for your community.

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What does Boise look like through the eyes of local artists?

 

150 Sunsets

What does Boise look like through the eyes of local artists?
By Karen Bubb, Public Arts Manager

In 2012, for 150 days photographer Ellen Crosby stood on a trail of the Military Reserve above St. Luke’s Hospital and photographed the same Kentucky coffee tree at sunset. Recording the same place at the same moment 150 times was her personal way to commemorate Boise’s Sesquicentennial. She captured the beauty in the small details of everyday life. Crosby combined these 150 images in a photomontage, which is on view at Boise City Hall, 3rd floor.

This is one of 24 works by 13 artists that the City of Boise purchased in 2014 to add to the Boise Visual Chronicle, a collection of artworks that reflect the diverse expression and concerns of artists responding to life in Boise. The collection originated in 1996 with funding from Greater Boise Auditorium District (GBAD) and then Capital City Development Corporation (CCDC) who purchased work for the collection from 1998 – 2005. Since then, new works are added biennially with funding from the City of Boise’s Percent-for-Art program. Currently the collection includes 129 works, valued at $133,650, all by Idaho artists.

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Arts & History Celebrates National Poetry Month

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The Academy of American Poets established April as National Poetry Month in 1996. That same year, President Bill Clinton proclaimed National Poetry Month on April 1 to “…celebrate not only the unsurpassed body of literature produced by our poets in the past, but also the vitality and diversity of voices reflected in the works of today’s American poetry…”. Ever since, the Academy of American Poets has encouraged participation in National Poetry Month through public proclamations, media attention, and individual and collective projects and initiatives to promote awareness of and appreciation for poetry’s important place in our culture.

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